Universität Hohenheim
 

Eingang zum Volltext

Nie, Peng

Essays on health and nutrition in China

Aufsätze über Gesundheit und Ernährung in China

(Übersetzungstitel)

Bitte beziehen Sie sich beim Zitieren dieses Dokumentes immer auf folgende
URN: urn:nbn:de:bsz:100-opus-10991
URL: http://opus.uni-hohenheim.de/volltexte/2015/1099/


pdf-Format:
Dokument 1.pdf (2.205 KB)
Dokument in Google Scholar suchen:
Social Media:
Delicious Diese Seite zu Mister Wong hinzufügen Studi/Schüler/Mein VZ Twitter Facebook Connect
Export:
Abrufstatistik:
SWD-Schlagwörter: Gesundheit , Ernährung , China
Freie Schlagwörter (Deutsch): Arbeitszeit , Peer- Effekte , Adipositas , Elastizitäten
Freie Schlagwörter (Englisch): Health , Nutrition , China , CHNS
Institut: Institut für Health Care & Public Management
Fakultät: Fakultät Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften
DDC-Sachgruppe: Sozialwissenschaften, Soziologie, Anthropologie
Dokumentart: Dissertation
Hauptberichter: Sousa-Poza, Alfonso Prof. Dr.
Sprache: Englisch
Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 10.06.2015
Erstellungsjahr: 2015
Publikationsdatum: 27.08.2015
 
Lizenz: Hohenheimer Lizenzvertrag Veröffentlichungsvertrag mit der Universitätsbibliothek Hohenheim ohne Print-on-Demand
 
Kurzfassung auf Englisch: This dissertation aims to investigate several major socio-economic determinants of health and nutrition in China. By using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) spanning from 1991 to 2009, this enhances the understanding of the transition of health and nutrition with such unprecedented economic and social changes in China.
This dissertation contains six chapters: more specifically, Chapter 1 gives a brief description of general background, research aim and also the outline. Then Chapter 2 examines the association between maternal employment and childhood obesity. Chapter 3 takes a comprehensive look at how income changes are related to calorie intake. Chapter 4 investigates the impacts of peers (one of most important aspects of social networks) on childhood and adolescent adiposity. Chapter 5 assesses the nexus between long work hours and health. Finally, Chapter 6 ends with some main conclusions and discussions.
Chapter 2 analyses the alarming increase of overweight and obese children and considers the higher female employment participation in China. We analyze how maternal employment is correlated with childhood obesity in China. Our work makes a non-Western comparison in this field, which is useful as it is rather difficult to generalize the results (mostly significant positive association between maternal employment and childhood obesity) from related studies in the Western world. More importantly, we further explore how maternal employment is related to two key transmitters of obesity: diet and physical activities. We find no association of maternal employment and childhood adiposity. Moreover, maternal employment is also not associated with either diet or physical activity of children. However, our results are well consistent with some recent evidence in Europe (Greve, 2011; Gwozdz et al., 2013), supporting the evidence that maternal employment might not necessarily be detrimental to child adiposity. One tentative explanation is that, the major source of informal childcare in China is grandparents, who are more likely to provide childcare with a high quality.
In Chapter 3, we provide an empirical analysis that looks at the association between income and calorie intake via a variety of parametric, nonparametric and semiparametric approaches. By means of panel data settings, we are capable of capturing time-invariant individual heterogeneity. It is worth noting that taking a close look at calorie-income elasticities is crucial and implicative of the effectiveness of income-mediated policies for food security in China. Our findings provide strong evidence that calorie-income elasticities are small, irrespective of using parametric, nonparametric, or semiparametric techniques. Furthermore, these elasticities remain small when taking nonlinearities into consideration, and also for sub-analysis for gender, individuals with differences in calorie intake or even impoverished households. Although calorie-income are small, our results are well in line with some prior studies (Bishop et al., 2010; Lu and Luhrmann, 2012; Shankar, 2010; Zhong et al., 2012), suggesting that households might be quite successful in maintaining calorie intake stable as income changes. Also note, despite the marked increase in income, the Chinese demand for better food quality, food diversity and food safety have amplified (Gale and Huang, 2007; Liu et al., 2013b), instead of an increased demand for calorie intakes.
Chapter 4 takes a detailed look at how peer effects are associated with childhood and adolescent obesity in China. It expands the empirical work beyond the Western domain in light of different cultural backgrounds between individualistic and collective societies. Furthermore, it broadens the dominant front of adolescents and adults by analyzing children as well. Note that, understanding peer effects on childhood adiposity is of great significance primarily because, as emphasized by Dishion and Tipsord (2011), children’s consumption behaviors are influenced by their peers. More importantly, childhood adiposity could result in persistent adulthood overweight or obesity (Loh and Li, 2013). In addition, the use of self-perceived perceptions of body weight allows for an exploration of the relation between peer effects and individual perceptions of weight status, thereby providing insights into understanding pathways by which peer effects operate within a relatively broader environment. We provide further evidence that peer effects exist not only among adolescents, but also children, suggesting that the formation of health lifestyles associated with peers is important for young children. In addition, we find that the magnitudes of peer effects change greatly over the distribution of individual BMI and stronger effects are observable at the upper end than at the bottom or median. This finding implies that obese individuals are more vulnerable to peers. Furthermore, females are more susceptible compared to males, which mirrors some U.S studies among adolescents (see, for instance, Trogdon et al., 2008). More importantly, we find that community-level average peer BMI is associated with self-perceived bodyweight in adolescents, providing evidence that a higher average peer BMI is related to the probability of a self-assessed perception of overweigh, in particular, for adolescent girls. All in all, our results support the existence of peer effects on childhood and adolescent obesity, but the magnitudes fall within the broader range for the U.S. adolescent studies using similar specification to ours. Therefore, it implies that peer effects do not necessarily strengthen within a collectivistic society, like China, as in comparison to the counterparts of an individualistic society, like the U.S.
In Chapter 5, we provide a comprehensive picture of how long work hours are related to health, using not only subjective but also objective measures. Also, it provides a valuable comparison with existing studies predominantly in the Western world. More importantly, it explores several potential mechanisms through which long work hours could impact upon one’s health. In particular, it investigates the relation between long work hours and specific lifestyles, such as sleep, diet (calorie and fat intakes, time spent food preparation and cooking), physical activities (sports participation and time spent on sedentary activities). Apart from a cross-sectional settings, it also adopts a panel analysis, which allows for controlling for unobserved individual heterogeneity. Because, to the best of our knowledge, the only three studies in China (Fritjers et al., 2009; Verité, 2004; Zhao, 2008) all investigate subjective measures of health via cross-sectional data. We reveal that working above 50 hours per week (31-40 hours per week as the comparison), increases the probability of suffering from high blood pressure, though the effects are relatively small. Also, self-evaluated health is poorer for individuals working long hours compared with those weekly working 31-40 hours, however the effect is not so strong. Eventually, long work hours have various impacts of different aspects of individual lifestyles. Specifically, we cannot find a positive correlation between long work hours and obesity. Nevertheless, long work hours seem to be related to a decreased fat intake and less time spent on sedentary activity like watching TV. But, long work hours decrease the probability of sports participation. In summary, we provide limited evidence that long work hours in China have deleterious influences on health or lifestyles. Therefore, further research needs to explore the potential impacts of long work hours on other health or lifestyle measures.
References
Bishop, J.A. Liu, H.Y. & Zheng, B.H. 2010. Rising incomes and nutritional inequality in China. . In: BISHOP, J. A. (ed.) Studies in Applied Welfare Analysis: Papers from the Third ECINEQ Meeting. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing.
Dishion, T.J. & Tipsord, J.M. 2011. Peer contagion in child and adolescent social and emotional development. Annual Review of Psychology, 62, 189-214.
Fritjers, P. Johnston, D.W. & Meng, X. 2009. The mental health cost of long working hours: the case of rural Chinese migrants. Mimeo.
Greve, J. 2011. New results on the effect of maternal work hours on childrens overweight status: does the quality of child care matter? Labour Economics, 18(5), 579-590.
Gwozdz, W. Sousa-Poza, A. Reisch, L.A. Ahrens, W. Henauw, S.D. Eiben, G. Fernandéz-Alvira, J.M. Hadjigeorgiou, C. De Henauw, S. Kovács, E. Lauria, F. Veidebaum, T. Williams, G. & Bammann, K. 2013. Maternal employment and childhood obesity - a European perspective. Journal of Health Economics, 32(4), 728-742.
Gale, F. & Huang, K.S. 2007. Demand for food quantity and quality in China, Economic Research Report. No.32. Washington D.C. : US Department of Agriculture.
Lu, L. & Luhrmann, M. 2012. The impact of Chinese income growth on nutritional outcomes. Available from
Liu, R.D. Pieniak, Z. & Verbeke, W. 2013b. Consumers attitude and behaviour towards safe food in China: a review. Food Control, 33(1), 93-104.
Loh, C.P. & Li, Q. 2013. Peer effects in adolescent bodyweight: evidence from rural China. Social Science & Medicine, 86, 35-44.
Shankar, B. 2010. Socio-economic drivers of overnutrition in China. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 23(5), 471-479.
Trogdon, J.G. Nonnemaker, J. & Pais, J. 2008. Peer effects in adolescent overweight. Journal of Health Economics, 27(5), 1388-99.
Verité 2004. Excessive overtime in Chinese supplier factories: causes, impacts and recommendations for action. Verité Research Paper, Amherst, Massachusetts.
Zhong, F.N. Xiang, J. & Zhu, J. 2012. Impact of demographic dynamics on food consumption: a case study of energy intake in China. China Economic Review, 23(4), 1011-1019.
Zhao, Z. 2008. Health demand and health determinants in China. Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, 6(1), 77-98.
 
Kurzfassung auf Deutsch: Ziel dieser Dissertation, ist es mehrere große sozioökonomische Determinanten der Gesundheit und Ernährung in China zu untersuchen. Durch die Verwendung von Daten aus der China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) von 1991-2009 verbessert diese Arbeit in einer innovativen Art und Weise das Verständnis über den Zusammenhang von Gesundheit und Ernährung mit wirtschaftlichen und sozialen Veränderungen in China.
Diese Dissertation besteht aus sechs Kapiteln: Kapitel 1 enthält eine kurze Beschreibung der allgemeinen Hintergründe, das Ziel der Forschung und eine Gliederung. In Kapitel 2 wird der Zusammenhang zwischen der Beschäftigung von Müttern und dem Auftreten von Adipositas bei Kindern untersucht. Kapitel 3 bietet einen umfassenden Überblick über die Verbindung zwischen Einkommensänderungen und der Kalorienaufnahme. Kapitel 4 untersucht die Auswirkungen der Peers (einer der wichtigsten Aspekte der sozialen Netzwerke) auf Adipositas unter Kindern und Jugendlichen. Kapitel 5 betrachtet den Zusammenhang zwischen langen Arbeitszeiten und Gesundheit. Mit einer Diskussionen und einigen wesentlichen Schlussfolgerungen schließt die Arbeit mit Kapitel 6 ab.
Kapitel 2 analysiert die alarmierende Zunahme der übergewichtigen und adipösen Kinder und betrachtet dabei die höhere Frauenerwerbsbeteiligung in China. Wir analysieren, wie die Beschäftigung der Mutter mit Adipositas bei Kindern in China korreliert. Da sich die Ergebnisse aus der westlichen Welt nicht zwingend übertragen lassen (meist signifikant positiver Zusammenhang zwischen mütterlicher Beschäftigung und Fettleibigkeit bei Kindern), bietet unsere Arbeit einen nicht-westlichen Vergleich in diesem Bereich. Weiter bieten wir einen erweiterten Ansatz, der untersucht, wie die Beschäftigung von Müttern zwei wichtige Ursachen von Adipositas beeinflusst: Ernährung und körperliche Aktivitäten. Wir finden keinen Zusammenhang zwischen der Beschäftigung von Müttern und Adipositas von Kindern. Darüber hinaus ist die Beschäftigung von Müttern weder mit Ernährung noch mit körperlicher Aktivität von Kindern verbunden. Diese Ergebnisse sind im Einklang mit einigen neueren Studien in Europa (Greve 2011; Gwozdz et al. 2013) und unterstützen die These, dass sich die Beschäftigung von Müttern nicht unbedingt nachteilig auf Adipositas bei Kindern auswirkt. Eine Erklärungsmöglichkeit ist, dass Großeltern, welche in China oft einen großen Anteil an der informellen Kinderbetreuung haben, sich entsprechend gut um die Kinder kümmern.
In Kapitel 3, bieten wir eine empirische Analyse, die den Zusammenhang zwischen Einkommen und Kalorienzufuhr analysiert und dabei eine Vielzahl von parametrischen, nicht-parametrischen und semiparametrischen Schätzverfahren verwendet. Mit Hilfe von Paneldaten sind wir in der Lage, für zeitlich konstante unbeobachtete Heterogenität zu kontrollieren. Es ist erwähnenswert, dass die detaillierte Analyse der Kalorien-Einkommenselastizitäten von entscheidender Bedeutung ist und Hinweise auf die Wirksamkeit der einkommensbasierten Sozialtransfers zur Nahrungsmittelsicherheit in China liefern können. Unsere Ergebnisse liefern starke Evidenz, dass die Kalorien-Einkommenselastizitäten klein sind. Dieses Ergebnis ist unabhängig von der Verwendung von parametrischen, nicht-parametrischen oder semiparametrische Methoden. Auch unter Berücksichtigung von Nichtlinearität bleiben die Elastizitäten klein; gleiche Ergebnisse zeigen sich auch bei weiteren Analysen mit Fokus auf das Geschlecht, Personen mit Unterschieden in Kalorienzufuhr oder verarmten Haushalten. Obwohl der Zusammenhang zwischen Kalorien und Einkommen klein ist, sind unsere Ergebnisse im Einklang mit einigen früheren Studien (Bishop et al. 2010; Lu und Luhrmann 2012; Shankar 2010; Zhong et al. 2012), was darauf hindeutet, dass die Haushalte relativ erfolgreich darin sind, die Kalorienzufuhr auch bei Einkommensveränderungen stabil zu halten. Zu berücksichtigen ist auch, dass trotz des deutlichen Anstiegs der Erträge, die chinesische Nachfrage nach besserer Lebensmittelqualität, Lebensmittelvielfalt und Lebensmittelsicherheit sich vergrößert hat (Gale und Huang 2007; Liu et al. 2013b), anstatt nur die Nachfrage nach Kalorien zu erhöhen.
Kapitel 4 beschäftigt sich mit Peer-Effekten bei Übergewicht unter Kindern und Jugendlichen in China. Die Arbeit erweitert die empirischen Erkenntnisse über die westliche Gesellschaft hinaus und berücksichtigt die unterschiedlichen kulturellen Hintergründe zwischen einer individualistischen und gemeinschaftlicheren Gesellschaftsausrichtung. Darüber hinaus erweitert das Papier die Literatur, da es im Gegensatz zu den meisten Arbeiten die Zusammenhänge auch bei Kindern analysiert und nicht nur unter Jugendlichen und Erwachsenen. Es ist besonders wichtig die Peer-Effekte unter Kindern zu verstehen, da, wie Dishion und Tipsord (2011) betont, diese besonders vom Konsumverhalten Gleichaltriger beeinflusst werden. Noch wichtiger ist, dass Adipositas in der Kindheit zu anhaltendem Übergewicht oder Fettleibigkeit im Erwachsenenalter führen kann (Loh und Li 2013). Darüber hinaus ermöglicht die Untersuchung der Selbsteinschätzung des Körpergewichts eine Analyse der Beziehung zwischen den Peer-Effekten und der individuellen Wahrnehmung des Gewichtsstatus. Hierdurch ergeben sich Einblicke in die Wirkungsweise durch die Peer-Effekte in einer relativ weiten Definition arbeiten. Wir liefern weitere Hinweise dafür, dass es Peer-Effekte nicht nur bei Jugendlichen gibt, sondern auch bei Kindern, was darauf hindeutet, dass die Ausbildung von Gesundheitslebensstilen auch bei Kindern durch gleichaltrige beeinflusst wird. Zusätzlich finden wir, dass die Stärke der Peer-Effekte sich über die Verteilung des individuellen BMIs ändert und stärkere Effekte eher am oberen Ende zu beobachten sind als am unteren Ende oder am Medianwert. Dieses Ergebnis bedeutet, dass übergewichtige Personen anfälliger für Einflüsse durch Altersgenossen sind. Im Vergleich zu Männern scheinen auch Frauen anfälliger für Peer-Effekte zu sein, was bereits durch einige US-Studien bei Jugendlichen gezeigt wurde (siehe zum Beispiel, Trogdon et al., 2008).
Ebenfalls beachtenswert ist, dass der durchschnittliche Peer BMI auf Gemeindeebene mit dem selbst wahrgenommenen Körpergewicht bei Jugendlichen zusammenhängt. Dies deutet darauf hin, dass ein Zusammenhang besteht zwischen einem höheren durchschnittlichen Peer BMI und der Wahrscheinlichkeit sich selbst als übergewichtig wahrzunehmen, ein Effekt besonders stark unter heranwachsenden Mädchen.
Alles in allem, unterstützen unsere Ergebnisse die Existenz von Peer-Effekten bei Adipositas unter Kindern und Jugendlichen, die Effektstärke fällt grob in den gleichen Bereich wie US-Studien mit ähnlicher Spezifikation unter Heranwachsenden. Dies impliziert, dass Peer-Effekte nicht notwendigerweise innerhalb einer kollektiven Gesellschaft wie China stärker sind als im Vergleich zu einer individualistischen Gesellschaft wie den USA.
In Kapitel 5 bieten wir ein umfassendes Bild über den Zusammenhang zwischen langen Arbeitszeiten und subjektiven sowie objektiven Gesundheitsindikatoren. Außerdem bieten wir einen wertvollen Vergleich mit vorhandenen Studien aus der überwiegend westlichen Welt. Noch wichtiger ist, dass wir mehrere mögliche Mechanismen erforschen, durch die sich lange Arbeitszeiten auf die Gesundheit auswirken könnten. Insbesondere wird der Zusammenhang untersucht zwischen langen Arbeitszeiten und bestimmten Lebensstilen wie Schlaf, Ernährung (Kalorien- und Fettaufnahme, Zeitaufwand für Lebensmittelzubereitung und Kochen) und körperlicher Aktivität (Teilnahme am Sport und die Zeit die mit sitzenden Tätigkeiten verbracht wird). Im Zusatz zu einer Querschnittanalyse, werden Paneldaten verwendet, um für unbeobachtete Heterogenität zu kontrollieren. Nach unserem besten Wissen basieren die einzigen drei existierenden Studien in China alle auf subjektiven Gesundheitsvariablen und Querschnittsdaten (Fritjers et al. 2009; Verité 2004; Zhao 2008). Wir zeigen, dass die Arbeit von über 50 Stunden pro Woche (31 bis 40 Stunden pro Woche als Vergleich), die Wahrscheinlichkeit erhöht, an Bluthochdruck zu leiden; diese Effekte sind jedoch relativ klein. Außerdem ist auch die subjektive Gesundheit leicht schlechter für Menschen mit langen Arbeitszeiten im Vergleich zu jenen mit einer wöchentlichen Arbeitszeit von 31-40 Stunden. Lange Arbeitszeiten können unterschiedliche Auswirkungen auf verschiedene Aspekte der individuellen Lebensstile haben. Genauer gesagt finden wir keine positive Korrelation zwischen langen Arbeitszeiten und Übergewicht. Dennoch scheinen lange Arbeitszeiten mit einer verminderten Fettaufnahme und weniger Zeit für sitzende Tätigkeit wie Fernsehen verbunden zu sein. Jedoch verringern lange Arbeitszeiten die Wahrscheinlichkeit an Sportaktivitäten teilzunehmen. Zusammenfassend lässt sich sagen, dass wir begrenzte Hinweise darauf finden, dass lange Arbeitszeiten in China nachteilige Einflüsse auf die Gesundheit oder Lebensstile haben. Daher sollte die weitere Forschung die möglichen Auswirkungen der langen Arbeitszeiten auf andere Gesundheits- oder Lebensstilindikatoren erkunden.
Literatur
Bishop, J.A. Liu, H.Y. & Zheng, B.H. 2010. Rising incomes and nutritional inequality in China. . In: BISHOP, J. A. (ed.) Studies in Applied Welfare Analysis: Papers from the Third ECINEQ Meeting. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing.
Dishion, T.J. & Tipsord, J.M. 2011. Peer contagion in child and adolescent social and emotional development. Annual Review of Psychology, 62, 189-214.
Fritjers, P. Johnston, D.W. & Meng, X. 2009. The mental health cost of long working hours: the case of rural Chinese migrants. Mimeo.
Greve, J. 2011. New results on the effect of maternal work hours on childrens overweight status: does the quality of child care matter? Labour Economics, 18(5), 579-590.
Gwozdz, W. Sousa-Poza, A. Reisch, L.A. Ahrens, W. Henauw, S.D. Eiben, G. Fernandéz-Alvira, J.M. Hadjigeorgiou, C. De Henauw, S. Kovács, E. Lauria, F. Veidebaum, T. Williams, G. & Bammann, K. 2013. Maternal employment and childhood obesity - a European perspective. Journal of Health Economics, 32(4), 728-742.
Gale, F. & Huang, K.S. 2007. Demand for food quantity and quality in China, Economic Research Report. No.32. Washington D.C. : US Department of Agriculture.
Lu, L. & Luhrmann, M. 2012. The impact of Chinese income growth on nutritional outcomes. Available from
Liu, R.D. Pieniak, Z. & Verbeke, W. 2013b. Consumers attitude and behaviour towards safe food in China: a review. Food Control, 33(1), 93-104.
Loh, C.P. & Li, Q. 2013. Peer effects in adolescent bodyweight: evidence from rural China. Social Science & Medicine, 86, 35-44.
Shankar, B. 2010. Socio-economic drivers of overnutrition in China. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 23(5), 471-479.
Trogdon, J.G. Nonnemaker, J. & Pais, J. 2008. Peer effects in adolescent overweight. Journal of Health Economics, 27(5), 1388-99.
Verité 2004. Excessive overtime in Chinese supplier factories: causes, impacts and recommendations for action. Verité Research Paper, Amherst, Massachusetts.
Zhong, F.N. Xiang, J. & Zhu, J. 2012. Impact of demographic dynamics on food consumption: a case study of energy intake in China. China Economic Review, 23(4), 1011-1019.
Zhao, Z. 2008. Health demand and health determinants in China. Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, 6(1), 77-98.

    © 1996 - 2016 Universität Hohenheim. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.  15.04.15